Tuesday, May 24, 2011

145/220

The American Oystercatcher, true to it’s name, specializes in eating bivalves. While they are fair commonly seen here during the summer months, come Fall they move farther south, seeking warmer temperatures. Upon their Spring arrival they get busy building nests and preparing to rise their young. Nests are scratched out in the sand, lined with peddles and sit along the high tide line. The clutch generally contains 2 -4 eggs. Many of eggs fall victim to the seagulls and are disturbed by many other predators, including man. These birds are of concern and are currently listed on the “yellow” list by the Audubon.

5 comments:

Jennifer Thompson said...

Beautiful bird.
I am learing a lot from your nature posts, I love them!

Carrie said...

Wow what a beak on that bird! Nice pic.

Karin said...

Your posts are often so educational, Trish. I just learned some new terms (eg "clutch")!

Janell said...

I'm learning a lot from your bird posts also! Bird photography sounds so interesting.

Kimberly said...

Great photo and information! Are you well versed in bird information or do you look things up? (like I would) :)