Saturday, October 8, 2011

281/84

They arrive at the southern most point of New Jersey by the millions. It is a feeding ground and resting place during their 2000 mile journey, from the northern U.S. to the forested mountains of central Mexico. There is still a great sense of mystery as to how the monarch is capable of making this incredible migratory journey.

Today we watched as the researchers captured data about these beautiful creatures including their sex, weight and wingspan.  They were then tagged and released.  Researchers will continue to tag thousands more this Autumn, and the studies will go on until the secret is discovered.


7 comments:

Kimberly said...

Very cool! You know how much I adore Monarchs! I so wish I could see their resting place!

Gretchen said...

Oh wow... that is very cool! I once banded ducks, but never butterflies. Great captures!

snapshots2011 said...

Even though I said I wasn't speaking to you ;) I'll still leave a comment..lol. That's awesome detail you got-- I would have loved to have been there. Darn work!!

Sinbad and I on the Loose said...

I saw a piece on Nature, Nova or some PBS program where they said it took three generations to complete the cycle, meaning two generations were going up and then down in the states, but the third one was actually making the gulf crossing. All of this only deepened the mystery. It was a similar routine for those here on the west coast. I could be wrong on some of this as I watched it long ago but that is the basic idea.

Maryvel Friesen said...

WOW! That is so . . . neat! I would love to see all those butterflies! I have never seen Monarchs around here! :(

Jacqueline said...

What they are doing...collecting data...is so interesting to me. Were you helping or observing? I love nature and what we can find in creation. Sometimes the smallest things are the loveliest, don't you agree?
Thank you for stopping by DeepRootsAtHome.com I appreciate the encouragement as I try to learn bit by bit how to take a great shot. I only have an S8100 Cool Pik, but it does pretty well in the macro department. I'm enjoying learning curve at 60 years old :)

Melinda said...

Amazing! Amazing! Amazing! I had no idea they were tagged- I've learned something here! In California, monarchs always come to Pacific Grove (Monterey)- you're inspiring me to go look for them!